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Download our Curriculum Catalog for an overview on each unit. Each Unit is for individual use only, per copyright restrictions. Click on the Get Started tab to quickly access the 'Build Your Own Curriculum' packages.

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  • Animals do pretty much the same thing as people when the weather turns colder – they leave for warmer areas: migrate; they stay inside: hibernate; or they change their habits – grow thicker coats and eat different foods: adapt. Animal behaviors have evolved over many, many years in order for each species to survive. Learning how animals have changed and adapted to changes in their habitat provides information for scientists, ecologists and environmentalists that will help the human race be able to change and survive changes.   Children that are inquisitive about how things work in their world are using higher level thinking and critical analysis skills to solve problems. Through hands-on activities, children:
    • See how polar bears (and other arctic animals) adapt by hiding the in ‘snow’
    • Feel cozy when ‘hibernating’ in a cave
    • Practice math skills in ‘geese migrating’ activity
      Knowing how the animals in our world are doing helps us understand how WE are doing. If an animal species is failing because of environmental changes, we should be aware of what that will do to the human race.   Every living creature is important and connected to each other!
  • Trains

    $12.00
    Children love trains!  There is something magical and engaging about hooking one train car to another, and moving along a track.  Children make trains out of boxes, chairs, their toys and each other.  Although most children do not have access to ‘climb aboard’ a train, most do live close enough to a train track to have watched a train go by!   Many early childhood and school readiness skills can be addressed through this fascination with trains.  Through hands-on activities, children: ·       Learn about the size of a train engine ·       Use laminated train cars to spell their name, other words or put the alphabet letters in order ·       Make a ‘train’ whistle ·       Go on a pretend train ride   Although most children do not have access to ‘climb aboard’ a train, most do live close enough to a train track to watch a train go by.  Taking a ‘trip’ on a cardboard box sparks imagination and creativity, encourages language and vocabulary development, and helps children acquire cognitive skills.
  • Teaching children to be generous and caring can help ensure a peaceful and supportive environment where all children grow and develop to their maximum potential. This is not only a great environment for children, but also for the adults that work in it… win-win for all!   Guiding children in expressing compassion and empathy towards others through day to day activities will help them develop life-long practices of caring for others. Through hands-on activities, children: ·       Create a ‘coupon book’ of nice things to do for others ·       Make a ‘I Care’ puppet to use in role playing how to care for others ·       Bake cookies to share with others   Help the children in your care learn that when we care for each other, we all are cared for!
  • The winter days can get long, and the bustle of the holiday season can cause an overload of emotions for children. Sometimes we all need to find some stress relief. Intentionally planning comfort-focused activities can help children (and adults) weather the stress of the season.   Children experience the fun of ‘popcorn and pajamas’ through these hands-on activities: ·       Hear the story, sing the song and act out ‘Ten in the Bed’ ·       Examine popcorn using magnifying glasses ·       Improve their matching skills with the Pajama Matching game ·       Use their fingerprints to create a ‘popping’ picture   Take some time to relax, put on some comfy clothes and snuggle up with the children and some good books! You will enjoy it and so will the children J
  • Iridescent shimmering scales….. Light and graceful feathers ….. Creatures of the sky and water …. Birds and fish have remarkable, protective coverings of their skin. There are so many things to do with fish and birds that can spark a child’s curiosity and desire to learn more. The more children understand about the world in which they live, the more likely it is that they will care for and respect all of the Earth’s living creatures and magnificence. Children explore the world of birds and fish through hands-on activities: • Practice counting ‘goldfish’, while having a snack too! • Categorize animals by differentiating between ‘feathered’ and ‘scaled’ animals • Explore how blowing can move a feather or keep it up in the air Feathers and scales add vibrant color to our world; birds and fish add graceful movement. Hopefully, children are inspired by these interesting creatures to design, create and invent.
  • Children are born with such promise and potential! As early childhood educators and providers, it is our responsibility to support and nurture each child’s development, and to encourage and celebrate individuality. In order to do this, it is important to know the children in care, understand ‘normal’ development, have knowledge of early learning standards, and be able to assess where each child is in their development.  Activities that help children recognize their strengths and areas of growth include: ·       Learn ·       Explore ·       Practice ·       Discover Children that recognize and celebrate their skills are developing positive self-esteem, which is critical for school and life success.
  • Making resolutions… Counting down the ‘ball’ drop… Seeing fireworks… These are common things many of us do to ring in the New Year.   Young children are just starting to understand how our world measures ‘time’. Part of that understanding includes knowledge of days, weeks and years. This Unit explores the start of a ‘new year’. Through hands-on activities, children will:
    • Begin to understand how a calendar helps track a year
    • Experience some traditional activities around the world for ‘ringing in’ the New Year
    • Practice counting skills with a bubble wrap blast countdown
  • Digging in soft garden soil ... Carefully planting the seeds ... Watering, weeding and watching ... Ah, finally after many weeks of caring for the garden, fresh vegetables! There is nothing more rewarding (or better tasting!) than fresh vegetables from the garden you have planted and taken care of! Children learn so many things from having their own garden. They gain a sense of accomplishment and pride; they learn about how plants grow through careful tending; and they learn how wonderful fresh vegetables taste (hopefully they will taste what they grow!). Children actively explore vegetables in this Unit through:
    • Learning about different vegetables through language activities
    • Tasting a variety of vegetables in the New One A Day challenge
    • Create their own vegetable garden in the Cement Block Veggie Garden activities
    Growing your own vegetables is an activity that provides hours of fun (and work!) for everyone - all ages, all abilities!
  • Summer

    $12.00
    Sunny days and bright blue skies ... Gentle winds and warm summer rains ... Shady trees and a picnic lunch ... A summer filled with these things provides hours of great outdoor fun. Summer is a great time to get outside to explore and run off some energy. Spending large amounts of time outside in the fresh air will help children be able to better concentrate and listen when they come indoors (hopefully!) Children can experience the joys of summer through these hands-on activities:
    • Reading about and listing all the fun things that can be done during the summer
    • Exploring how the sun be used to tell time
    • Examining a lemon and use it for a citrus-y scented picture
    • Practicing throwing while cooling off in the sprinkler
    Summer usually goes by way too quickly. Enjoy the sunny days while you can, and maybe remember some of these ideas to bring inside when the weather turns cooler!
  • Pizza Pizzazz

    $12.00
    Ooey, gooey melt-y cheese …... Pepperoni, sausage, mushrooms, onions …… Crispy crust and spicy sauces …... What do you like best about pizza? Almost everyone loves some kind of pizza – whether it is a traditional pepperoni with tomato sauce or a ‘blonde’ pizza with chicken and Alfredo sauce. Pizza is a great topic that can provide learning in all areas – cognitive, language, creative and motor. Taking a field trip to a pizzeria is a really fun activity, especially if the children get to make their own pizza! Encourage children to explore all types of learning through these hands-on pizza activities: • Reading a recipe to make a personal pizza • Practicing sequencing in the ‘Top the Pizza’ game • Throwing a soft Frisbee ‘pizza’ As one of the pizza songs in the Unit says…. ‘Eatalota Eatalota Eatalota pizza’!
  • Shoes

    $12.00
    Stomping in cowboy boots …... Flip-flops for beach walking…... Squeaky new tennis shoes…… We all wear special shoes made for specific occasions. Shoes can spark a child’s imagination as they think about where the shoes have been and where they are going! They help children understand about the world around them when they talk about what type of shoes people wear for different events or tasks. Shoes also provide a great tool for learning about scientific observation and mathematical counting and sorting. Shoes are perfect for all types of learning! Shoes are everywhere, and easy to gather in a box or bin for exploration. Shoe activities in this Unit provide hands-on learning through: • Counting, sorting and charting the many different characteristics of shoes • Following the lines to untangle the ‘laces’ • Sculpting a shoe with self-hardening clay Red and blue, in pairs of two…. Shoes for me, shoes for you …. Shoes are everywhere!
  • Roses really, really red….. The sky so big and blue ….. Yellow sun means lots of fun Bright colors for me and you …… Making up color poems are fun and easy, with so many colorful things in our world. Just look around! Color brings a lot of joy and excitement to our world. But color can also be used to learn math and counting skills, and for scientific exploration! Color is also a great tool for developing vocabulary and descriptive language skills. The more senses children use in their exploration, the more likely they are to retain valuable information. This Unit helps children explore color through: • Discovering what happens when your mix paint • Counting and matching colors • Using colored noodles to make great creations Add a little color to your day every day and see what happens!