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Download our Curriculum Catalog for an overview on each unit. Each Unit is for individual use only, per copyright restrictions. Click on the Get Started tab to quickly access the 'Build Your Own Curriculum' packages.

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  • Making resolutions… Counting down the ‘ball’ drop… Seeing fireworks… These are common things many of us do to ring in the New Year.   Young children are just starting to understand how our world measures ‘time’. Part of that understanding includes knowledge of days, weeks and years. This Unit explores the start of a ‘new year’. Through hands-on activities, children will:
    • Begin to understand how a calendar helps track a year
    • Experience some traditional activities around the world for ‘ringing in’ the New Year
    • Practice counting skills with a bubble wrap blast countdown
  • Clouds

    $12.00
    Puffy as marshmallows ….. Streaks across the sky ….. Playing peek-a-boo with the sun ..… Clouds can be a sign of things to come, or a sculpture in the sky. No matter what, they play an important part in our weather. On a warm spring or summer day, it is great fun for children to lay on their backs and gaze up into the clouds to ‘see what they can see’. Children that can ‘see’ various things in the clouds are more apt to look at other things in their world with more imagination and interest. Teaching children to really look at things in their world helps them to become better observers, and to develop language skills to describe what they see. Exploring clouds provides many learning experiences for children. Through hands-on activities, children: • Learn about the different types of clouds • Explore how a cloud is made through a great science experiment • Strengthen fine motor muscles and coordination • Use their imagination to ‘see’ sculptures in the sky Children are so open to new ideas and learning. Showing them how to discover pictures in clouds is an activity that they can do for the rest of their lives.
  • Buttoning Up

    $12.00
    Coats, jackets and shirts ….. Big, little, round and square ….. Insert, push and pull …… Buttons can be a challenge for all of us sometimes! Learning to button, zip and tie are major accomplishments for children as they develop independence through mastering self-help skills. Providing opportunities for lots of practice ensures that children are able to master these skills. Children that are competent in taking care of their basic needs feel better about themselves and develop confidence in their abilities, which in turn supports school readiness. Buttons are an easy material to access. Through hands-on activities, children: • Discover what items of clothing have buttons • Practice math skills through graphing buttons • Use buttons as a material for creativity • Practice buttoning as they make a cool headband The more children have the opportunity to manipulate buttons, the better they will be at being able to dress independently – and that is a goal we are working towards! NOTE: Activities using buttons should be closely supervised; size of buttons should be appropriate for ages of children
  • Trains

    $12.00
    Children love trains!  There is something magical and engaging about hooking one train car to another, and moving along a track.  Children make trains out of boxes, chairs, their toys and each other.  Although most children do not have access to ‘climb aboard’ a train, most do live close enough to a train track to have watched a train go by!   Many early childhood and school readiness skills can be addressed through this fascination with trains.  Through hands-on activities, children: ·       Learn about the size of a train engine ·       Use laminated train cars to spell their name, other words or put the alphabet letters in order ·       Make a ‘train’ whistle ·       Go on a pretend train ride   Although most children do not have access to ‘climb aboard’ a train, most do live close enough to a train track to watch a train go by.  Taking a ‘trip’ on a cardboard box sparks imagination and creativity, encourages language and vocabulary development, and helps children acquire cognitive skills.
  • The winter days can get long, and the bustle of the holiday season can cause an overload of emotions for children. Sometimes we all need to find some stress relief. Intentionally planning comfort-focused activities can help children (and adults) weather the stress of the season.   Children experience the fun of ‘popcorn and pajamas’ through these hands-on activities: ·       Hear the story, sing the song and act out ‘Ten in the Bed’ ·       Examine popcorn using magnifying glasses ·       Improve their matching skills with the Pajama Matching game ·       Use their fingerprints to create a ‘popping’ picture   Take some time to relax, put on some comfy clothes and snuggle up with the children and some good books! You will enjoy it and so will the children J
  • Taking care of the earth is for everyone all the time
  • ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’ Book by Laura Joffe Numeroff Milk and cookies ….. Scissors and tape ….. Crayons and paper…… We all have memories of these items, which are critical parts of the book ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’. The story line of this book is so typical of many of us – we do one thing and it triggers another activity or memory! (How many of you go to put laundry in and end up doing something entirely different when you get to the laundry room!) One key literacy skill that is developed through this book is the ability to remember and sequence the order of activities. This is an important school readiness task. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Participate in a reenactment of the story, based on the sequence of events • Practice counting skills with the ‘Cookie Count’ game • Experiment with different ways to paint, using different painting tools • Improve scissor skills when cutting grass ‘hair’ This book is the first in the ‘If You Give…’ series by Laura Joffe Numeroff and Felicia Bond. Children will delight in the antics of Mouse as things they might also do!
  • ‘Sneezy the Snowman’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Maureen Wright Rolling, rolling, rolling ….. Stacking huge snowballs ….. Adding nose, mouth, eyes and a hat …… Making a snowman is something many of us have done time and time again. In this story, Sneezy the Snowman is cold. In trying to warm up, he makes choices that are not in his best interest! Children will find the humor in this story as they realize that the choices made have a negative consequence. This is a good way to talk about choices with children. The story is also written with rhyming words which can help children develop listening and literacy skills. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that are inspired by this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Develop visual discernment skills in playing snowman matching games • Use higher level thinking and problem-solving skills to describe why their snowman melted when creating their own melted snowman • Discover the ‘life cycle’ of a snowman, and snow or ice • Create a unique, one-of-a-kind snowman with a balloon, paint, and art scraps
  • Shapes

    $12.00
    Shapes Unit of Study Highlights Circles, triangles, and squares ….. Sometimes triangles in squares ….. Geometric patterns in fabric and on buildings ….. We can find different common shapes in many things in our daily lives. Learning about shapes is important in many areas of development and school-readiness. Being able to discern and differentiate shapes teaches children to be visually discriminate, a skill that is essential in learning to read and do math – children need to be able to differentiate between a ‘b’ and ‘d’, and ‘3’ and ‘5’. It also helps children develop descriptive vocabulary which assists in communicating, key to success in school and social situations. There are SO many learning activities that can be offered using shapes. In this Unit, some of the hands-on activities include: • Making a Shape Book • Becoming a Shape Detective • Creating Shape Art with puffy paint • Using play dough on Shape Mats Our world is full of shapes, some simple and some more complex. Helping children see these shapes can expand their mental horizons!
  • ‘Harold and the Purple Crayon’ Unit Book by Crockett Johnson A cardboard box made into a spaceship….. Blankets tossed over a table that turned into a castle….. Making the most delicious cake out of mud …… Imaginary friends and pretend play made up much of our early years. Through this, we learned to be creative and problem solve – just as Harold does in the story ‘Harold and the Purple Crayon’! Problem solving and creativity often go hand-in-hand. Usually, to solve a problem, higher level thinking, analysis, and innovation are needed which is part of the creative process. Every day, children are thinking about the things in their lives and what to do with them or how to use them. As children solve problems, they gain knowledge and self-confidence in their ability to succeed. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Increase their usable vocabulary (helps them get ready to read!) • Discover how to make the color purple • Strengthen finger muscles and fine motor coordination through a cutting activity. Harold has several other adventures too. Crockett Johnson wrote stories that children could easily relate to.
  • Doors that open magically ….. Riding in the cart, up and down the aisles ….. And an entire row of candy! …… Children are amazed with the many things that are part of a grocery shopping trip. The grocery store is a cornerstone of many neighborhoods and communities. Grocery stores provide food from a wide variety of sources that encourage children to learn more about their world. Visiting a grocery store provides learning opportunities that support social skill development, helps children understand the work and support of people in their community, and provides real-life learning in social systems understanding (how we get food from ‘farm to table’). Learning about the grocery store provides children real-life knowledge that will be useful throughout their lives. Through hands-on activities, children: • Practice writing skills making a grocery list • Fill a paper bag counting grid with grocery items • Use tempera paint to create their own grocery ad • Make a grocery cart out of a cardboard box for fun races Children love to visit the grocery store. Providing trips to local businesses and places of interest help children develop important social skills and increase their vocabulary about the world around them.
  • Children are growing, developing, and challenging what their bodies can do every day!  The Summer Olympics provide a great example of how dedicated athletes come together with athletes from all over the world to celebrate their hard work and achievements.  This can be a great time for children to think about their own physical fitness skills, and set goals to work towards fulfilling. Being physically fit is a goal we have for life-long success.  Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Learn about the Olympics and the dedication it takes to be an Olympic athlete
    • Use various tools to measure, weigh and time objects and activities
    • Participate in their own Olympic Games complete with an Olympic Parade
    Strengthening our body’s core, and developing stamina, balance and coordination will help children be physically fit for success in school and social interactions with friends.  As children get older, it becomes more and more important for them to feel confident in their physical appearance and body fitness.