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Download our Curriculum Catalog for an overview on each unit. Each Unit is for individual use only, per copyright restrictions. Click on the Get Started tab to quickly access the 'Build Your Own Curriculum' packages.

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  • ‘Stone Soup’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Ann McGovern Peeling potatoes, slicing carrots ….. Setting the table ….. Washing dishes in a sudsy sink…… Most of us loved to help with kitchen tasks. The book Stone Soup lends itself to recreating these tasks for the children in care. Providing them opportunities to learn real-life, self-help skills such as cooking will help them develop independence. Children that are confident in taking care of themselves often are more open to caring for others. Sharing resources is one thing we can do to care for others. In this story, children see how everyone gets a lot from sharing just a little. Children that are ‘caring and sharing’ are developing important personal attitudes such as empathy which will help them become caring and contributing citizens in their communities. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Participate in a reenactment of the story, based on the sequence of events • Compare vegetables based on weight, size and color • Make beautiful designs using vegetables • Toss beanbag vegetables into a cardboard pot And of course, make soup!
  • ‘The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Audrey and Don Wood Red and ripe ….. Sweet and juicy ….. The smell of fresh strawberries …… At the strawberry patch, it is hard to fill up the basket without eating a few! Summer is the time for picking and eating luscious fresh strawberries. Just like the little mouse wanted to do in the book, ‘The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear’. The book invites children to help little mouse find a way to keep the ripe strawberry safe from the big hungry bear. The best solution is for little mouse to share the strawberry with a friend! More fun strawberry activities provided by the United States Department of Agriculture - Food and Nutrition Service, can be found at https://buildingstrongchildren.usu.edu/files/Book7.pdf This book, (and strawberries) inspire many fun learning activities. Through hands-on activities, children: • Hunt for letters to spell out words from the book • Practice math skills by matching numerals, dots, and written number words • Make a ‘strawberry patch’ to pick berries and use in the Strawberry Farmer’s Market dramatic play area • Create strawberries for a basket using scented self-hardening clay Reading this book will definitely make you want to eat some strawberries yourself!
  • ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Maurice Sendak Talking back or sassing ….. Consequences ….. Re-instated with the ones we love …… Most of us have experienced this sequence of events when we were children… misbehaving, having a consequence, and then back in the fold of our family’s love. Children will act out and push their boundaries … this is how they learn about their boundaries, and how to interact in an appropriate what with family members and out in society. There are consequences for all of our behaviors – some are positive consequences, and some are ‘learning experiences’. When positive behavior guidance strategies are used with love, children learn what appropriate expectations are. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Write a letter to a loved one • Create their own monster using a variety of art materials • Use ‘monster feet’ and their large muscles when following an obstacle course We all have a ‘wild thing’ inside of us…. we just need to know how to tame it!
  • Animals do pretty much the same thing as people when the weather turns colder – they leave for warmer areas: migrate; they stay inside: hibernate; or they change their habits – grow thicker coats and eat different foods: adapt. Animal behaviors have evolved over many, many years in order for each species to survive. Learning how animals have changed and adapted to changes in their habitat provides information for scientists, ecologists and environmentalists that will help the human race be able to change and survive changes.   Children that are inquisitive about how things work in their world are using higher level thinking and critical analysis skills to solve problems. Through hands-on activities, children:
    • See how polar bears (and other arctic animals) adapt by hiding the in ‘snow’
    • Feel cozy when ‘hibernating’ in a cave
    • Practice math skills in ‘geese migrating’ activity
      Knowing how the animals in our world are doing helps us understand how WE are doing. If an animal species is failing because of environmental changes, we should be aware of what that will do to the human race.   Every living creature is important and connected to each other!
  • Bats

    $12.00
    Bats Unit of Study Highlights Silently soaring in a night sky….. Catching thousands of mosquitos each night ….. Pollinating plants and dispersing seeds …… Bats have acquired a bad reputation but are really very important mammals to eco systems and agriculture across the world. Bats are fascinating creatures to watch and study. Many American bat species are in severe population decline or are already endangered, as they are worldwide. Bats contribute to a healthy environment, productive agriculture crops, and have provided insight to the scientific world. The Bat Rescue website has a lot of great information about this helpful little creature http://www.batrescue.org/batfacts/batfacts.html Children that gain an understanding of how different animal species contribute to the Earth’s well-being are more likely to become ‘stewards of the Earth’. Bats can be used to inspire learning through: • Using the ‘a-t’ of ‘b-a-t’ to create other words in a rhyming word wheel • Encouraging children to become bat scientists or chiroptologists • Exploring painting techniques to create a bat mobile • Playing a game to experience ‘sound location’ Let’s all go ‘batty’ for the good of our planet!
  • Sharing stories and secrets….. Discovering hidden treasures on a neighborhood ‘expedition’….. Making up games in the back yard…… Many of us have memories of doing these things with childhood friends. Learning what makes a good friend, and learning how to be a good friend is something that we should be teaching our youngest children. The character traits that make up a good friend are the same ones that will help alleviate bullying in the classroom. We need to help children feel special and that they are a valuable, contributing member to the group. This nurtures a sense of ‘community’ which promotes kindness, understanding of others, celebrating accomplishments, and the goal of working together. Learning about being a friend is a fun and joyful experience. Through hands-on activities, children: • Concretely see how each person is an important member of the group when they take ‘attendance’ • Practice measuring skills as they see how tall they and their friends are • Create a group ‘friendship quilt’ where every square is unique • Work their large muscles in an action game The more children are involved with each other in positive activities, the more they will see how valuable each child is to the group… and that everyone can be friends!
  • Children are born with such promise and potential! As early childhood educators and providers, it is our responsibility to support and nurture each child’s development, and to encourage and celebrate individuality. In order to do this, it is important to know the children in care, understand ‘normal’ development, have knowledge of early learning standards, and be able to assess where each child is in their development.  Activities that help children recognize their strengths and areas of growth include: ·       Learn ·       Explore ·       Practice ·       Discover Children that recognize and celebrate their skills are developing positive self-esteem, which is critical for school and life success.
  • Blast Off!

    $12.00
    A dark sky alight with stars ….. Planets viewed through amazing telescopes ….. Is there really life on Mars? …… The idea of what outer space holds is intriguing to many of us. Children are too young to grasp the entire concept of space – solar systems, galaxies and our Universe…. For that matter, many of us are confused!! Here is a great explanation of the difference from NASA. The following is excerpts from https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/news-display.cfm?News_ID=573 Our Solar System consists of our star, the Sun, and its orbiting planets (including Earth), along with numerous moons, asteroids, comet material, rocks, and dust. Our Sun is just one star among the hundreds of billions of stars in our Milky Way Galaxy. The universe is all of the galaxies – billions of them! NASA’s telescopes allow us to study galaxies beyond our own in exquisite detail, and to explore the most distant reaches of the observable universe. In this Unit, children learn about space through these hands-on activities: • Create a picture of planets and orbits using various painting techniques • Use rockets for a trio of mathematical activities • Pretend to ‘walk on the moon’ like an astronaut There are so many things to do in the great outdoors. Invite the children to come up with other ideas to incorporate into your planning all year long. Think about this (again from https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/news-display.cfm?News_ID=573) You are one of the billions of people on our Earth. Our Earth orbits the Sun in our Solar System. Our Sun is one star among the billions in the Milky Way Galaxy. Our Milky Way Galaxy is one among the billions of galaxies in our Universe. You are unique in the Universe!
  • Bread

    $12.00
    Bread Unit of Study Highlights Measuring and mixing ….. The smell of yeast in the air ….. Melting butter on bread fresh from the oven …… Nothing better the smell and taste of fresh baked bread! Children today may not have experienced the yummy smell of yeast bread baking in the oven. But for many of us, it brings a nostalgic memory of moms or grandmas baking bread. Why a Unit on Bread? From Wikipedia “Bread is a staple food prepared from a dough of flour and water, usually by baking. Throughout recorded history it has been popular around the world and is one of the oldest artificial foods, having been of importance since the dawn of agriculture.” Bread is found throughout the world and is one of the many things that can show a connection between cultures and countries. Not only is bread good for eating, children can also learn many skills through the study of bread including: • Using fine motor skills to create letters out of dough • Practicing counting and naming numbers • Imitating life with the Bread Baking Dramatic Play box • Creating yummy bread art Bread is a staple in all cultures – just in different forms. Fun to try the many different types!
  • Bubble-Rama

    $12.00
    Whether children are blowing or chasing bubbles, painting with them, imitating them or studying them, most children will have an emotional reaction to them.  Just listen to the excited voices of children when you bring out that bottle of bubbles!
  • Buttoning Up

    $12.00
    Coats, jackets and shirts ….. Big, little, round and square ….. Insert, push and pull …… Buttons can be a challenge for all of us sometimes! Learning to button, zip and tie are major accomplishments for children as they develop independence through mastering self-help skills. Providing opportunities for lots of practice ensures that children are able to master these skills. Children that are competent in taking care of their basic needs feel better about themselves and develop confidence in their abilities, which in turn supports school readiness. Buttons are an easy material to access. Through hands-on activities, children: • Discover what items of clothing have buttons • Practice math skills through graphing buttons • Use buttons as a material for creativity • Practice buttoning as they make a cool headband The more children have the opportunity to manipulate buttons, the better they will be at being able to dress independently – and that is a goal we are working towards! NOTE: Activities using buttons should be closely supervised; size of buttons should be appropriate for ages of children
  • Caterpillars

    $12.00
    Green and chubby ... Poky spikes ... Brown and fuzzy ... Caterpillars come in all different colors, shapes and forms, and children love to collect them! Caterpillars provide a very close-up examination of the small creatures that live in our world. Children can study small eco-systems by catching a caterpillar and setting up an environment for it, complete with the correct food, water and a branch. If you are lucky, the caterpillar may spin a cocoon or turn into a chrysalis - wait a few weeks and you may hatch a moth or butterfly! Through hands-on activities in this Unit, children:
    • Discover the difference between cocoons and chrysalises
    • Use a special 'inchworm' ruler to measure various items
    • Practice fine motor skills by making a button caterpillar
    Explore caterpillars with your children and re-discover the joys of childhood.