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Download our Curriculum Catalog for an overview on each unit. Each Unit is for individual use only, per copyright restrictions. Click on the Get Started tab to quickly access the 'Build Your Own Curriculum' packages.

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  • Messy but fun concoctions
  • Festivals of Light
  • Marching Band

    $12.00
    There are many types of musical instruments that are easy to make with children.  This Unit includes several that are fun and different .  Enjoy the music you and children can make together!!
  • Children are born with such promise and potential! As early childhood educators and providers, it is our responsibility to support and nurture each child’s development, and to encourage and celebrate individuality. In order to do this, it is important to know the children in care, understand ‘normal’ development, have knowledge of early learning standards, and be able to assess where each child is in their development.  Activities that help children recognize their strengths and areas of growth include: ·       Learn ·       Explore ·       Practice ·       Discover Children that recognize and celebrate their skills are developing positive self-esteem, which is critical for school and life success.
  • Mittens & Hats Unit of Study Highlights Thumbs in the thumb holes ….. Fingers all together ….. That’s how mittens keep our hands warm …… In cold, winter weather! Many of us remember the frustration of trying to get fingers in the right places when putting on gloves – mittens are so much easier! Teaching children how to put on their own mittens and hat helps them become one step closer to being independent – a goal we need to have for our children. This Unit uses hats and mittens as a tool to help children explore their world. Through hands on activities, children: • ‘Build’ a mitten to keep track of books read • Practice putting items in ‘sets of 3’, a great math skill • Use visual acuity to find matching mittens • Strengthen finger muscles through hanging up mittens and hats on a clothesline It is easy to take every day items and use them as teaching tools. Children are learning from everything in their environment – even their hats and mittens!
  • Gardening

    $12.00
    Children love watching their garden grow!
  • Most children enjoy a trip to the zoo to see the many different animals.  This is a good way to teach children about taking care of the animals in our world, especially those that are on the endangered species list.  Most zoos provide an educational program for groups of children.  There are also some great websites that provide animal webcams and a virtual zoo experience.     Children learn best through active exploration.  Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Stretch and move with Animal Yoga
    • Participate in drama, acting out Goodnight Gorilla by Peggy Rathann
    • Create their own ‘kangaroo pouch’
    • Practice cutting skills by creating a lion
    There are so many animals to learn about in our world.  The Jungle Safari Unit of Study provides activities on other animals children might see in a zoo.
  • Winter

    $12.00
    Frosty noses….. Snowflakes falling softly….. Hot chocolate and marshmallows ….. Winter is a season that can be filled with joy as it heralds many fun outdoor activities – as long as we are dressed for the weather! Hats, mittens, boots and warm coats are a must! Through active outdoor play, children are able to use their large muscles when exploring all of the changes they see in the environment. They are also able to use a lot of energy and exercise those large muscles! Then come inside and warm up inside with a mug of hot chocolate or apple cider. Through these hands-on activities, children are able to explore winter when they: • Use real mittens to create a special mitten painting • Create words out of snowflake letters • Play a game to understand how animals hibernate, migrate or adapt Every year, we go through many seasons. Helping children to understand what happens in each season helps them to find the ‘joy of the season’!
  • Open and closed ….. Awake and asleep ….. Tall and short …… All of us experience ‘opposites’ many times every day. The ‘The Opposite Zoo’ provides many opposite pairs that help children expand their knowledge of the world, and their vocabulary. Every day we use our senses to see, hear, touch and taste differences in things in our world.  One key literacy skill that is developed through this book is the ability to make the distinctions of features that result in the understanding of ‘opposite’ concepts. This is an important school readiness task. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book.  Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Make bead necklaces with patterns of big and small beads
    • Move their bodies to various ‘opposite pairs’ such as fast and slow
    • Create distinct art work with black on white and white on black materials
    • Use their taste buds to compare different opposite tastes
    Children that use the vocabulary of ‘opposite pairs’ are much better at defining and explaining things they see or experience in their world.
  • Starry nights and the smell of a campfire
  • Polar Animals

    $12.00
    Find out about polar bears and penguins
  • Hats

    $12.00
    Fancy Easter hats…..    The hat grandpa wore ….. A hat to keep out the rain…… Most adults and children have some special experiences or memories with hats. Hats are a universal item – they can be found in all cultures, and in all countries. Hats are used in all seasons, and for many special occasions. How hats are used can encourage a very interesting conversation that helps children build vocabulary words. Lots of childrens’ books have been written about hats. Hats can be used to teach math, develop fine and gross motor skills, and used in creative activities. And, hats can just be fun! Children explore hats through these hands-on activities: ·       Help celebrate the birthday of Dr. Seuss (March 2) ·       Use hats to start learning about mathematical sets and equations ·       Examine the different types of hats worn for particular jobs ·       Develop fine motor skills through making a patchwork hat Hats provide a fun and engaging material for learning activities. The more children are engaged in the learning experience, the more knowledge is retained and skills are developed. Hip hip hooray for hats!
  • Doors that open magically ….. Riding in the cart, up and down the aisles ….. And an entire row of candy! …… Children are amazed with the many things that are part of a grocery shopping trip. The grocery store is a cornerstone of many neighborhoods and communities. Grocery stores provide food from a wide variety of sources that encourage children to learn more about their world. Visiting a grocery store provides learning opportunities that support social skill development, helps children understand the work and support of people in their community, and provides real-life learning in social systems understanding (how we get food from ‘farm to table’). Learning about the grocery store provides children real-life knowledge that will be useful throughout their lives. Through hands-on activities, children: • Practice writing skills making a grocery list • Fill a paper bag counting grid with grocery items • Use tempera paint to create their own grocery ad • Make a grocery cart out of a cardboard box for fun races Children love to visit the grocery store. Providing trips to local businesses and places of interest help children develop important social skills and increase their vocabulary about the world around them.
  • FURRY FRIENDS

    $12.00
    Puppies, and Kittens, and Bears... Oh My!
  • Pumpkins

    $12.00
      Pumpkins are fun to grow, interesting to explore, work well in art projects, and very healthy to eat.  What more do we need?
  • Making resolutions… Counting down the ‘ball’ drop… Seeing fireworks… These are common things many of us do to ring in the New Year.   Young children are just starting to understand how our world measures ‘time’. Part of that understanding includes knowledge of days, weeks and years. This Unit explores the start of a ‘new year’. Through hands-on activities, children will:
    • Begin to understand how a calendar helps track a year
    • Experience some traditional activities around the world for ‘ringing in’ the New Year
    • Practice counting skills with a bubble wrap blast countdown
  • ‘Firefighter Frank’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Monica Wellington Hat, coat and boots ….. Ladders and hoses ….. Lights and sirens …… These are all things that most of us can relate to the brave men and women who fight our fires. Firefighter Frank helps children to understand the work of a firefighter, AND the importance of good fire safety practices. Although October is generally thought of as ‘Fire Safety’ month, learning about fire safety and developing strategies to be safe is something that needs to be addressed all year long. Children are learning through everything they do and experience. Through hands-on activities, children: • Draw a picture of themselves as a firefighter • Create a fire truck from basic shapes • Develop large motor skills and coordination by climbing up and down steps, stairs, and ladders • Plan out a nutritious lunch The Fire Safety Unit of Study, available at http://earlylearningsuccess.net/product/fire-safety-unit-of-study/is a great companion Unit!
  • Check out what
  • Under the Sea

    $12.00
    Children are very inquisitive about the world they live in, and love learning about different animals that live in the world with them.  Helping children see the beauty in the world that surrounds them nurtures a love of the environment, and everything that inhabits it. Hopefully this will instill in children a desire to take care of all the creatures that share the earth with them. There are so many different creatures to explore in an Under the Sea Unit of Study.  Through this Unit we explore only a few animals but children should be encouraged to discover others. Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Discover the beauty of a coral reef through sculpting coral
    • Investigate the differences in the many types of sea shells
    • Use colored sand to write their names
    • Explore the many creatures living in the sea through reading books
    Spend some time ‘Under the Sea’ to see what creatures live and play there! More sea and ocean ideas are available in the Wet & Wild Unit of Study
  • ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’ Book by Laura Joffe Numeroff Milk and cookies ….. Scissors and tape ….. Crayons and paper…… We all have memories of these items, which are critical parts of the book ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’. The story line of this book is so typical of many of us – we do one thing and it triggers another activity or memory! (How many of you go to put laundry in and end up doing something entirely different when you get to the laundry room!) One key literacy skill that is developed through this book is the ability to remember and sequence the order of activities. This is an important school readiness task. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that can be developed based on this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Participate in a reenactment of the story, based on the sequence of events • Practice counting skills with the ‘Cookie Count’ game • Experiment with different ways to paint, using different painting tools • Improve scissor skills when cutting grass ‘hair’ This book is the first in the ‘If You Give…’ series by Laura Joffe Numeroff and Felicia Bond. Children will delight in the antics of Mouse as things they might also do!
  • ‘Click, Clack, Moo Cows that Type’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Doreen Cronin Cows mooing in the barn ….. Chickens laying eggs ….. Pigs in mud, and wooly sheep ….. This is how most of us remember barn animals. But, this book has the animals acting surprisingly different! The cows in this story are cold and are asking Farmer Brown for electric blankets. When he refuses, the cows must think of a way to change his mind. This story shows children how to use language (via the typewriter) and group actions to get the results they want. Children will see how working together and compromise can help solve problems so that everyone is happy. The learning activities in this book Unit encourage children to: • Participate in math games using barn animals (matching, patterning, and counting); • Re-enacting the story through dramatic play; • Explore the difference between hot and cold • Try some yummy snacks made with ingredients from the farm Children will enjoy seeing the animals decide what they need, and then find a way to get it!
  • Bugs

    $12.00
    Bugs and children go hand in hand in the summer!
  • Have some fun in snow
  • Wind & Water

    $12.00
    Bubbles, balloons and kites ... Running through sprinklers ... Gentle breezes and summer rain ... Most of us have memories of hours of spring and summer fun using wind and water. Water play is lots of fun for children and can be done any time, inside or out. And, most children don't need much direction in getting started! Children may have more limited experience with 'wind play', but almost all children love bubbles and balloons! This Unit helps children begin to understand that wind and water are 'forces of nature' that can be harnessed to provide energy and power for many things. Wind and water are easy to access, 'free' materials readily available for children to explore. Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Learn how air can move things
    • Explore the different materials that can be moved by air
    • Differentiate between 'more' and 'less' through counting 'raindrops'
    • Use various equipment (cups, funnels, turkey basters, strainers etc.) to explore the properties of water
    Exploring and experimenting with common forces of nature helps children learn about the world around them.
  • ‘Planting A Rainbow’ Unit Book by Lois Ehlert Sunny days in the garden ….. The sprinkler swishing to and fro ….. Amazement as the seeds turn into beautiful flowers …… The book Planting a Rainbow can evoke these memories of childhood gardening. Planting seeds and watching them grow into beautiful flowers or wonderful vegetables is a great way to expose children to the wonders of the environment. Once children have experienced the colors that can be found in the garden, they will be more aware of colors in every part of their world. Gardening is also great physical exercise, can be a tool to teach scientific observation and recording, and may instill in children the love of caring for our environment … all good things! There are so many great activities that can be based on gardening, and all the colors that surround us. Through hands-on activities, children: • Write their names (letters or other words) using seeds • Use rainbow ribbons in a Maypole dance • Squish-paint to make a crown of rainbow-colored flowers • Turn fruit into rainbow skewers, yum! Planting A Rainbow by Lois Ehlert may inspire young children to become ardent gardeners, a practice that can become a life-long interest.  
  • Explore winter fun!
  • Springing Up

    $12.00
    Spring is happy time of year!  Get out there and explore with your children and catch their excitement!
  • Digging in soft garden soil ... Carefully planting the seeds ... Watering, weeding and watching ... Ah, finally after many weeks of caring for the garden, fresh vegetables! There is nothing more rewarding (or better tasting!) than fresh vegetables from the garden you have planted and taken care of! Children learn so many things from having their own garden. They gain a sense of accomplishment and pride; they learn about how plants grow through careful tending; and they learn how wonderful fresh vegetables taste (hopefully they will taste what they grow!). Children actively explore vegetables in this Unit through:
    • Learning about different vegetables through language activities
    • Tasting a variety of vegetables in the New One A Day challenge
    • Create their own vegetable garden in the Cement Block Veggie Garden activities
    Growing your own vegetables is an activity that provides hours of fun (and work!) for everyone - all ages, all abilities!
  • Bread

    $12.00
    Bread Unit of Study Highlights Measuring and mixing ….. The smell of yeast in the air ….. Melting butter on bread fresh from the oven …… Nothing better the smell and taste of fresh baked bread! Children today may not have experienced the yummy smell of yeast bread baking in the oven. But for many of us, it brings a nostalgic memory of moms or grandmas baking bread. Why a Unit on Bread? From Wikipedia “Bread is a staple food prepared from a dough of flour and water, usually by baking. Throughout recorded history it has been popular around the world and is one of the oldest artificial foods, having been of importance since the dawn of agriculture.” Bread is found throughout the world and is one of the many things that can show a connection between cultures and countries. Not only is bread good for eating, children can also learn many skills through the study of bread including: • Using fine motor skills to create letters out of dough • Practicing counting and naming numbers • Imitating life with the Bread Baking Dramatic Play box • Creating yummy bread art Bread is a staple in all cultures – just in different forms. Fun to try the many different types!
  • Find colors every where!
  • Children are growing, developing, and challenging what their bodies can do every day!  The Summer Olympics provide a great example of how dedicated athletes come together with athletes from all over the world to celebrate their hard work and achievements.  This can be a great time for children to think about their own physical fitness skills, and set goals to work towards fulfilling. Being physically fit is a goal we have for life-long success.  Through hands-on activities, children:
    • Learn about the Olympics and the dedication it takes to be an Olympic athlete
    • Use various tools to measure, weigh and time objects and activities
    • Participate in their own Olympic Games complete with an Olympic Parade
    Strengthening our body’s core, and developing stamina, balance and coordination will help children be physically fit for success in school and social interactions with friends.  As children get older, it becomes more and more important for them to feel confident in their physical appearance and body fitness.
  • The Rodeo

    $12.00
    The creak of leather from a saddle….. The snort and whinny of a horse….. Clip-clop and giddy-up…… These are sounds that are very familiar to those that have been around horses. Current day rodeos evolved out of the activities and chores from old-time cowboys that worked on cattle ranches in the West. Rodeo cowboys and cowgirls are some of the toughest and most graceful athletes there are in the competition world. It takes hours of practice, the mental and physical toughness to experience pain and defeat, and a competitive spirit. Young children love to learn about the many different things in their world. Through hands-on activities, they: • Develop a larger, working vocabulary through books, discussions, finger plays and songs • Practice counting skills through a ‘horseshoe’ game • Make a vest, chaps, bandana and hat – just like the rodeo cowboys! • Taste a yummy cowboy stew, made to their liking Rodeos are fun for everyone, and are held throughout the country.
  • My Restaurant

    $12.00
    My Restaurant Unit of Study Highlights Burgers and fries….. A creamy milkshake….. Pizza dripping with melted cheese…… What are your childhood memories of ‘eating out’? Eating out at a restaurant is a great learning experience for children. They learn to make decisions based on what they like, they practice appropriate social skills, they start to understand that we have to ‘pay’ for items, and they see all the different roles people have in a restaurant. Children will take this learning and re-visit it when engaging in ‘restaurant’ dramatic play. This is how they make sense of the world in which they live. Through restaurant play and exploration, children: • Develop vocabulary and speaking skills; • Practice counting and sorting food items; • Create food from self-hardening clay; • Develop large and small motors with the Serving Tray Game There are many different types of restaurants, offering a variety of foods. Try having a Pizza Shoppe one week, a Taco Stand the next week, and a Burger & Fries Drive-In the next… this could go on for a long time!
  • Sea and Sand

    $12.00
    Summer is the time for beach fun!
  • Caterpillars

    $12.00
    Green and chubby ... Poky spikes ... Brown and fuzzy ... Caterpillars come in all different colors, shapes and forms, and children love to collect them! Caterpillars provide a very close-up examination of the small creatures that live in our world. Children can study small eco-systems by catching a caterpillar and setting up an environment for it, complete with the correct food, water and a branch. If you are lucky, the caterpillar may spin a cocoon or turn into a chrysalis - wait a few weeks and you may hatch a moth or butterfly! Through hands-on activities in this Unit, children:
    • Discover the difference between cocoons and chrysalises
    • Use a special 'inchworm' ruler to measure various items
    • Practice fine motor skills by making a button caterpillar
    Explore caterpillars with your children and re-discover the joys of childhood.
  • Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus ….. Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale ….. Just Me and My Mom …… Just Me and My Dad …… Favorite books by well-known authors/illustrators! – Mo Willems and Mercer Mayer. Reading to children provides so many positive experiences – snuggling up to see the pictures, learning new vocabulary words, using higher level problem solving skills to figure out what the picture is saying, and gaining knowledge from the book are just a few! The more children are read to, the more likely they will become readers themselves. Being able to read is a key factor in being successful in school, and as an adult. Integrating other activities with reading a book helps children really ‘cement’ ideas and concepts. In this Unit, children explore some of the work of Mo Willems and Mercer Mayer through these hands-on activities: • Create their own finger print ‘little critter’ to add to their drawings • Play a counting game by adding ice cream scoops to their cone • Paint their own, special ‘knuffle bunny’ • Demonstrate things that they CAN do in a circle game Books are a window to seeing so many wonderful things in our world. Help children develop a love of reading by finding great children’s books – many which are written and illustrated by the same person!