Winter

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||Winter
  • ‘Sneezy the Snowman’ Unit of Study Highlights Book by Maureen Wright Rolling, rolling, rolling ….. Stacking huge snowballs ….. Adding nose, mouth, eyes and a hat …… Making a snowman is something many of us have done time and time again. In this story, Sneezy the Snowman is cold. In trying to warm up, he makes choices that are not in his best interest! Children will find the humor in this story as they realize that the choices made have a negative consequence. This is a good way to talk about choices with children. The story is also written with rhyming words which can help children develop listening and literacy skills. There are a lot of fun, learning activities that are inspired by this book. Through hands-on activities, children: • Develop visual discernment skills in playing snowman matching games • Use higher level thinking and problem-solving skills to describe why their snowman melted when creating their own melted snowman • Discover the ‘life cycle’ of a snowman, and snow or ice • Create a unique, one-of-a-kind snowman with a balloon, paint, and art scraps
  • Animals do pretty much the same thing as people when the weather turns colder – they leave for warmer areas: migrate; they stay inside: hibernate; or they change their habits – grow thicker coats and eat different foods: adapt. Animal behaviors have evolved over many, many years in order for each species to survive. Learning how animals have changed and adapted to changes in their habitat provides information for scientists, ecologists and environmentalists that will help the human race be able to change and survive changes.   Children that are inquisitive about how things work in their world are using higher level thinking and critical analysis skills to solve problems. Through hands-on activities, children:
    • See how polar bears (and other arctic animals) adapt by hiding the in ‘snow’
    • Feel cozy when ‘hibernating’ in a cave
    • Practice math skills in ‘geese migrating’ activity
      Knowing how the animals in our world are doing helps us understand how WE are doing. If an animal species is failing because of environmental changes, we should be aware of what that will do to the human race.   Every living creature is important and connected to each other!
  • Mittens & Hats Unit of Study Highlights Thumbs in the thumb holes ….. Fingers all together ….. That’s how mittens keep our hands warm …… In cold, winter weather! Many of us remember the frustration of trying to get fingers in the right places when putting on gloves – mittens are so much easier! Teaching children how to put on their own mittens and hat helps them become one step closer to being independent – a goal we need to have for our children. This Unit uses hats and mittens as a tool to help children explore their world. Through hands on activities, children: • ‘Build’ a mitten to keep track of books read • Practice putting items in ‘sets of 3’, a great math skill • Use visual acuity to find matching mittens • Strengthen finger muscles through hanging up mittens and hats on a clothesline It is easy to take every day items and use them as teaching tools. Children are learning from everything in their environment – even their hats and mittens!
  • Iced Up

    $12.00
  • Making Tracks

    $12.00
    Fresh fallen snow ….. Footprints made by who?….. Tracks leading where? ….. Tracks in the snow (or mud) are fascinating to follow, seeing who made them and where they lead. Seeing and following animal tracks can provide a wealth of information and engaging learning activities for children (and adults!). Through following animal tracks, we can see where they live, where they hunt for or find food, and how they care for their young. Animal tracks can provide the opportunity for children to develop scientific observation and higher level thinking skills. Animal tracking is fun and engaging. Through hands-on activities, children: • Learn how to visually differentiate between different shapes of tracks • Use their own footprint as a tool for measuring • Create a clay tile of animal tracks Finding animal tracks can be done in any season with mud and snow. At the river bed, on a sandy road or the snow around the base of a tree, animals are leaving a footprint to their presence.
  • Making resolutions… Counting down the ‘ball’ drop… Seeing fireworks… These are common things many of us do to ring in the New Year.   Young children are just starting to understand how our world measures ‘time’. Part of that understanding includes knowledge of days, weeks and years. This Unit explores the start of a ‘new year’. Through hands-on activities, children will:
    • Begin to understand how a calendar helps track a year
    • Experience some traditional activities around the world for ‘ringing in’ the New Year
    • Practice counting skills with a bubble wrap blast countdown
  • The winter days can get long, and the bustle of the holiday season can cause an overload of emotions for children. Sometimes we all need to find some stress relief. Intentionally planning comfort-focused activities can help children (and adults) weather the stress of the season.   Children experience the fun of ‘popcorn and pajamas’ through these hands-on activities: ·       Hear the story, sing the song and act out ‘Ten in the Bed’ ·       Examine popcorn using magnifying glasses ·       Improve their matching skills with the Pajama Matching game ·       Use their fingerprints to create a ‘popping’ picture   Take some time to relax, put on some comfy clothes and snuggle up with the children and some good books! You will enjoy it and so will the children J
  • Winter

    $12.00
    Frosty noses….. Snowflakes falling softly….. Hot chocolate and marshmallows ….. Winter is a season that can be filled with joy as it heralds many fun outdoor activities – as long as we are dressed for the weather! Hats, mittens, boots and warm coats are a must! Through active outdoor play, children are able to use their large muscles when exploring all of the changes they see in the environment. They are also able to use a lot of energy and exercise those large muscles! Then come inside and warm up inside with a mug of hot chocolate or apple cider. Through these hands-on activities, children are able to explore winter when they: • Use real mittens to create a special mitten painting • Create words out of snowflake letters • Play a game to understand how animals hibernate, migrate or adapt Every year, we go through many seasons. Helping children to understand what happens in each season helps them to find the ‘joy of the season’!
  • Have some fun in snow
  • Explore winter fun!
  • Festivals of Light
  • Snuggle up with someone you love